Expertly Created

Medicine Interview Programs are prepared by IME's specialist medical physicians and senior lecturers from major Australian University Medical Schools with first hand experience in admissions interviews.

Modern Materials

IMEs preparation materials reflect the current trends identified within real medical school admissions interviews. Our materials will have you walk into your interview feeling confident and prepared.

Personalised Preparation

With the Medicine Interview Mentorship Program, students receive personalised tutorials and mock interviews with members of IMEs expert academic faculty that are tailored to your ideal medical school.

Clearing The Final Hurdle: Admissions Interviews

The IME provides industry-leading Medicine Admissions Interview preparation courses to both Australian and International students. The medical school admissions interview represents the final hurdle for entry to undergraduate and postgraduate medical streams.

The IME’s interview preparation courses prepare students for semi-structured and Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) formats, via insights into interview rationale, scoring, response styles, themes, and access to previous interview scenarios with fully worked solutions.

Free Medicine Interview Scenarios

The Medicine Admissions Interview represents the final hurdle to students prior to entering graduate or post-graduate medical programs.

Institute of Medical Education's Medicine Admissions Interview Question Generator provides example themes and interview questions that are assessed across a diverse number of medical schools.

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Medicine Interviews

Students who complete an IME Medicine Admissions Interview course are better prepared and have the confidence to succeed in their Medical School Admissions Interview. The Medicine Admissions Interview programs below help students build an understanding of the intent behind the scenarios they will face in their interview, ideal response style, and the scoring criteria required for success. The programs provide students with practical preparation and personal mentorship both in-person and online.

Medicine Application & Interview Mentorship Program (IN600)

Medicine Application & Interview Mentorship Program (IN600)

$1,497.00

Calendar1 year

Clock1 year

PinIME classroom & online

  • Comprehensive Medicine Interview Mentorship
  • Personal Tutorials
  • Application and Portfolio Review
  • 2 Subject Inclusions
  • Medicine Interview Online Scenario Course (IN301)
  • Medicine Interview Live Workshop (IN302)
  • 100 Interview Scenarios
  • 100 Exemplar Responses
  • Live Mock Interview Practice
  • Prepared by Specialist Doctors and Senior Lecturers at Australian Medical Schools

Medicine Interview Online Scenarios (IN301)

Medicine Interview Online Scenarios (IN301)

$997.00

Calendar1 year

Clock1 year

PinIME classroom & online

  • 100 Interview Scenarios
  • 100 Exemplar Responses
  • Additional Online Modules
  • 100% Online
  • Prepared by Specialist Doctors and Senior Lecturers at Australian Medical Schools

Medicine Interview Live Workshop (IN302)

Medicine Interview Live Workshop (IN302)

$997.00

Calendar1 year

Clock1 year

PinIME classroom & online

  • Live Mock Interview
  • 4 Mock Medicine Interviews
  • 20 MMI Stations
  • 1 Full Day Workshop
  • 1 Online Pre-Workshop Module

Happy Dream (Not Nightmare) Interview: MMI Preparation

Happy Dream (Not Nightmare) Interview: MMI Preparation

The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) is unlike your traditional panel interview. MMIs consist of numerous stations (sometimes up to ten), each focused on a different question or scenario, set up...

${reading_time(`The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) is unlike your traditional panel interview. MMIs consist of numerous stations (sometimes up to ten), each focused on a different question or scenario, set up in a separate room with a new interviewer. Many candidates make the mistake of preparing for MMIs as they would for a regular job interview, by getting straight to the point and answering questions directly. Recall that the role of Medicine Admissions Interview is to assess a candidate's suitability for a career in Medicine. Being frank and forthright in a medical setting may cause more harm than good; all options need to be considered — and communicated — to ensure appropriate care is provided to patients.   To succeed in MMI settings, you must first understand the key competencies as determined by the interviewing medical school i.e., the ability to: Interact effectively with peers, healthcare team, patients, and their families Contribute effectively as a team member Act ethically and demonstrate the capacity to care Communicate efficiently and assimilate, organise, and present information concisely Promote health maintenance   Naturally, these key competencies direct the topics explored at different interview stations. Although the content varies slightly between universities, the themes of MMIs generally centre around: Personal questions Emotional communication Problem solving Resilience and maturity Enthusiasm for Medicine Awareness of common issues in Medicine Ethics and empathy It is important to note that due to the high volume of candidates participating in Medicine Admissions Interviews each year, it is impossible to recruit large numbers of clinicians to assess all participants. Therefore, your assessors may also include academics, members of the administrative staff, medical students, or even individuals drawn from the wider community, like butchers and landscapers. So, why does this matter?Your final interview score will be based on your ability to answer the question/scenario presented and how well you communicate your response. You must practice sharing your answers in a universally understandable style — remember, as a doctor your job is to present information to patients in a comprehensible fashion. And when I say practice, I do not mean the weekend before your interview. Interview performance makes up a significant chunk of your ranking required for medical school offers, which is why you should start preparing for interviews before offers are released. It is recommended you spend at least a few weeks (or a couple of months) preparing, practicing scenarios under interview conditions with someone who understands the criteria.  When practicing, it is important to arrange your response according to a particular pattern. One such technique is the SPIES format, used for interpersonal conflict and ethical issues in clinical situations: Seek information – identify who the stakeholders are Patient safety – make sure the patient is okay before proceeding Initiative – can you do anything yourself to solve the problem Escalate – involve other colleagues if you require further assistance Support – support all those involved  For instance, you are a junior doctor in a hospital and overhear a fellow doctor talk down to a nurse who they say was high on illicit drugs in a nightclub last night. How would you address the situation? Using the SPIES technique, we can propose: Seek information – correctly identify that the nurse, doctor, hospital governing body, and immediate patients require attention. Patient safety – make sure to check up on all the patients who are currently under the care of the nurse. Initiative – ascertain viewpoints from both the doctor and the nurse (in a private setting and not in front of patients). You may have to involve the hospital disciplinary body if it is found that an employee is under the influence of intoxicating substances at work. Try to organise another nurse to look after the patients until more information is provided.  Escalate – seek guidance from senior registrars/consultants at the hospital and/or report the matter to the hospital disciplinary body. Support – If it is found that the nurse is under the influence of illicit substances, they should rightly be disciplined by the hospital’s governing body. However, the nurse should also receive counselling or directives to pathways to help resolve their drug problem, as taking illicit substances could be a sign of deeper mental health issues. Conversely, if the doctor who initially raised the concern was lying, a meeting with peers should be proposed to examine workplace bullying.  Other techniques for responding to general and ethical scenarios exist; however, you should work to develop a technique of your own to help organise your thoughts. Some MMI stations will require strong, robust responses covering a wide range of topics and this can only be achieved with well-articulated and organised answers. Importantly, once key stakeholders are identified, you should work through responses that address each viewpoint. The Institute of Medical Education Medicine Admissions Interview Question Generator provides example themes and interview questions that are assessed across a diverse number of medical schools. If you receive an offer for interview, our Interview Mentorship Program will give you the best chance at entry, so contact us today!`)} Arror right

Hooray, I Received An Interview For Medicine! Now What?

Hooray, I Received An Interview For Medicine! Now What?

Congratulations! All that hard work studying has paid off and you now have an offer for Medicine Admissions Interview. However, you might want to hold back on those celebratory cartwheels,...

${reading_time(`Congratulations! All that hard work studying has paid off and you now have an offer for Medicine Admissions Interview. However, you might want to hold back on those celebratory cartwheels, as the final interview boss is waiting for you (cue suspenseful music). Whether you are going down the undergraduate or postgraduate medical school pathway, the interviews are structured similarly. This is because the Medicine Admissions Interview assesses a candidate's suitability for a career in Medicine.   Undergraduate pathways into Medicine Interview selection for an Australian undergraduate Medicine program commonly requires a UCAT and ATAR score and is offered to applicants with the highest combined ranking in these two areas (note: James Cook University and Bond rely on academic performance, only). Entry into these programs is open to anyone and not just secondary students; however, this comes with a catch. For applicants who are studying or have completed a tertiary degree, they will be assessed for admission to Medicine on their tertiary study results and ATAR score. For example, non-rural entry into the UNSW undergraduate Medicine program for 2022 required an ATAR of at least 96 and a WAM of 70. Most undergraduate medical schools have similar cut-offs and due to the highly competitive nature of entry requirements, this means that if you were unlikely to enter undergraduate Medicine straight out of high school, you are also unlikely to do so following tertiary studies. Therefore, almost all tertiary students go down the GAMSAT path for postgraduate Medicine entry. Postgraduate pathways into Medicine Interview selection for an Australian postgraduate Medicine program requires a GAMSAT result and GPA score from their undergraduate degree. Some schools like the Universities of Notre Dame Sydney/Fremantle and Wollongong also require a portfolio of personal and community experience. When matching offers for interviews, GEMSAS provides an online application and matching system for domestic applicants to postgraduate medical schools (note: Flinders University utilize their own system). Through the GEMSAS system, applicants can list up to six preferences and are ranked on GPA, GAMSAT results, and any other selection criteria such as a portfolio and bonuses. It is this ranked list that schools use to make offers for interview. Types of Interviews The Medicine Admissions Interview aims to assess the suitability of the applicant for training i.e., the ability to communicate effectively, act ethically, and promote health maintenance. All medical schools (barring the University of Sydney) conduct either structured interviews or Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs). Structured interviews are directed by a panel of interviewers who ask each applicant the same set of questions, whereas MMIs have several stations that applicants move around and involves a question or task. Generally, the themes of these interviews centre around: Personal questions Emotional communication Problem solving Resilience and maturity Enthusiasm for Medicine Awareness of common issues in Medicine Ethics and empathy All GEMSAS medical schools utilise the MMI format, whereas most undergraduate medical streams tend toward semi-structured interviews. This is in part because undergraduate medical schools focus more of their time on personal questions, trying to gauge your desire to study Medicine. Interview scores are standardised for postgraduate GEMSAS medical schools, only, and can be used by other participating schools in the allocations for offers of places. Interview performance makes up a significant chunk of your ranking required for medical school offers — most times, it is worth 50% of your final score. Your UCAT or GAMSAT results mean nothing here, which is why you should start preparing for interviews before offers are released, to give you the best chance of scoring highly. The Institute of Medical Education Medicine Admissions Interview Question Generator provides example themes and interview questions that are assessed across a diverse number of medical schools. If you have been lucky enough to receive an offer for interview, our Interview Mentorship Program will give you the best chance at entry.  Offers   Traditionally, postgraduate Medicine offers are released in early November for GEMSAS schools and undergraduate offers are made from January (via UAC). GEMSAS and UAC crunch all the numbers and allocate applicants to offers of medical school places according to school selection rules and applicant preferences. Some offers will be conditional upon the completion of the participant’s current studies and maintenance of their GPA. The types of places offered by medical schools include Commonwealth Supported Places, Bonded Medical Places, Medical Rural Bonded Scholarships, and Full-Fee Places. An outline of these four place types can be found here. If you were unsuccessful, you will receive notification of this directly. However, should schools have any vacancies, additional offers will be made to selected previously unsuccessful applicants.  `)} Arror right

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