Expertly Created

At the Institute of Medical Education, our GAMSAT courses are prepared by specialist medical physicians and senior lecturers from major Australian University Medical Schools.

Modern Materials

Be supported by preparation materials that are fit for the 21st century. Our materials are continually updated to mirror the current trends identified in the GAMSAT.

Personalised Preparation

Programs include unlimited access to IME's pre-medical academic faculty. Our comprehensive and planned approach provides students with their best chance of GAMSAT success.

Improve your GAMSAT Performance and Guaranteed Entry into Medicine

IME's GAMSAT preparation programs enable the development of intuitive understanding of the concepts required to excel in all sections of GAMSAT. Additionally, they emphasise critical-thinking and a focus on the application of knowledge.

Since problem-based learning techniques are central to modern medical curricula, our GAMSAT preparation is constructed with a major focus on the assessment of problem-solving ability across a wide range of subject areas. Since the introduction of the digital GAMSAT, the IME has helped scores of undergraduate and postgraduate students achieve their dream of being accepted into medical school.

Students that complete all aspects of the GAMSAT Premier Program are guaranteed* to receive an offer into an Australian medical school.

Free GAMSAT Exam

Get access to IME's GAMSAT Essentials Free Course & Trial Exam now. The vast majority of candidates we engage with have little idea about how to ideally approach the GAMSAT exam. So, diving straight into humanities or physical science course theory may not help you to advance Section Scores; but we know what will.

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Section II Essay Generator

Click the button below to access IME's GAMSAT Section II Generator. The Written Communication Section II of the GAMSAT tests the ability to develop ideas on socio-cultural and personal issues. Our Essay Writing Quote Generator provides 68 essay themes with example arguments against each prompt.

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2022 Webinar Schedule

Click the button below to see our scheduled webinars for 2022. All webinars are delivered by our academic team and focus on high-yield GAMSAT topics.

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Free MMI Interview Scenarios

IME's Medicine Admissions Interview Question Generator provides example themes and interview questions that are assessed across a diverse number of medical schools.

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GAMSAT

The Institute of Medical Education’s GAMSAT preparation programs enable the development of intuitive understanding of the concepts required to excel in all sections of the exam. IME’s modern programs emphasise critical thinking and focus on teaching students the skills needed to secure a place in postgraduate Medicine.

GAMSAT Premier Program (GA500)

GAMSAT Premier Program (GA500)

$5,997.00

Calendar2 years

Clock2 years

PinInteractive GAMSAT classroom & online

  • 2200+ MCQs
  • 70+ hours on-demand video content
  • Fortnightly group Q&A Webinar sessions
  • 50 marked essays with feedback report
  • 9 GAMSAT & Interview preparation subjects
  • 5+ mock GAMSAT exams
  • Unlimited personal tutor support
  • 12-hours personal tutorials
  • 12 on-demand recorded GAMSAT Science lectures
  • Medicine Application Review
  • Medicine Interview Preparation

GAMSAT Foundations Program (GA400)

GAMSAT Foundations Program (GA400)

$2,397.00

Calendar1 year

Clock1 year

PinInteractive GAMSAT classroom & online

  • 1200+ MCQs
  • 30+ hours on-demand video content
  • Access to Q&A Webinar sessions
  • 12 marked essays with feedback report
  • 6 GAMSAT preparation subjects
  • 2 mock GAMSAT exams

GAMSAT Essentials Program (GA300)

GAMSAT Essentials Program (GA300)

$1,097.00

Calendar6 Months

Clock6 Months

PinInteractive GAMSAT classroom & online

  • 500+ MCQs
  • 10+ hours on-demand video content
  • Access to Q&A Webinar sessions
  • 6 marked essays with feedback report
  • 5 GAMSAT preparation subjects
  • 1 mock GAMSAT exam

Happy Dream (Not Nightmare) Interview: MMI Preparation

Happy Dream (Not Nightmare) Interview: MMI Preparation

The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) is unlike your traditional panel interview. MMIs consist of numerous stations (sometimes up to ten), each focused on a different question or scenario, set up...

${reading_time(`The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) is unlike your traditional panel interview. MMIs consist of numerous stations (sometimes up to ten), each focused on a different question or scenario, set up in a separate room with a new interviewer. Many candidates make the mistake of preparing for MMIs as they would for a regular job interview, by getting straight to the point and answering questions directly. Recall that the role of Medicine Admissions Interview is to assess a candidate's suitability for a career in Medicine. Being frank and forthright in a medical setting may cause more harm than good; all options need to be considered — and communicated — to ensure appropriate care is provided to patients.   To succeed in MMI settings, you must first understand the key competencies as determined by the interviewing medical school i.e., the ability to: Interact effectively with peers, healthcare team, patients, and their families Contribute effectively as a team member Act ethically and demonstrate the capacity to care Communicate efficiently and assimilate, organise, and present information concisely Promote health maintenance   Naturally, these key competencies direct the topics explored at different interview stations. Although the content varies slightly between universities, the themes of MMIs generally centre around: Personal questions Emotional communication Problem solving Resilience and maturity Enthusiasm for Medicine Awareness of common issues in Medicine Ethics and empathy It is important to note that due to the high volume of candidates participating in Medicine Admissions Interviews each year, it is impossible to recruit large numbers of clinicians to assess all participants. Therefore, your assessors may also include academics, members of the administrative staff, medical students, or even individuals drawn from the wider community, like butchers and landscapers. So, why does this matter?Your final interview score will be based on your ability to answer the question/scenario presented and how well you communicate your response. You must practice sharing your answers in a universally understandable style — remember, as a doctor your job is to present information to patients in a comprehensible fashion. And when I say practice, I do not mean the weekend before your interview. Interview performance makes up a significant chunk of your ranking required for medical school offers, which is why you should start preparing for interviews before offers are released. It is recommended you spend at least a few weeks (or a couple of months) preparing, practicing scenarios under interview conditions with someone who understands the criteria.  When practicing, it is important to arrange your response according to a particular pattern. One such technique is the SPIES format, used for interpersonal conflict and ethical issues in clinical situations: Seek information – identify who the stakeholders are Patient safety – make sure the patient is okay before proceeding Initiative – can you do anything yourself to solve the problem Escalate – involve other colleagues if you require further assistance Support – support all those involved  For instance, you are a junior doctor in a hospital and overhear a fellow doctor talk down to a nurse who they say was high on illicit drugs in a nightclub last night. How would you address the situation? Using the SPIES technique, we can propose: Seek information – correctly identify that the nurse, doctor, hospital governing body, and immediate patients require attention. Patient safety – make sure to check up on all the patients who are currently under the care of the nurse. Initiative – ascertain viewpoints from both the doctor and the nurse (in a private setting and not in front of patients). You may have to involve the hospital disciplinary body if it is found that an employee is under the influence of intoxicating substances at work. Try to organise another nurse to look after the patients until more information is provided.  Escalate – seek guidance from senior registrars/consultants at the hospital and/or report the matter to the hospital disciplinary body. Support – If it is found that the nurse is under the influence of illicit substances, they should rightly be disciplined by the hospital’s governing body. However, the nurse should also receive counselling or directives to pathways to help resolve their drug problem, as taking illicit substances could be a sign of deeper mental health issues. Conversely, if the doctor who initially raised the concern was lying, a meeting with peers should be proposed to examine workplace bullying.  Other techniques for responding to general and ethical scenarios exist; however, you should work to develop a technique of your own to help organise your thoughts. Some MMI stations will require strong, robust responses covering a wide range of topics and this can only be achieved with well-articulated and organised answers. Importantly, once key stakeholders are identified, you should work through responses that address each viewpoint. The Institute of Medical Education Medicine Admissions Interview Question Generator provides example themes and interview questions that are assessed across a diverse number of medical schools. If you receive an offer for interview, our Interview Mentorship Program will give you the best chance at entry, so contact us today!`)} Arror right

What Motivates You To Sit The GAMSAT?

What Motivates You To Sit The GAMSAT?

If you find yourself here reading this post, you are likely preparing for GAMSAT. You may be preparing to the sit the GAMSAT for the first time, or you may be...

${reading_time(`If you find yourself here reading this post, you are likely preparing for GAMSAT. You may be preparing to sit the GAMSAT for the first time, or you may be one of most candidates who are re-sitting the exam. In either case, it is important to consider and eliminate the internal obstructions which may impede your success. To do so, ask yourself the following questions: What is it that you want? If you haven’t asked yourself this question, you need to do this before progressing. What does the question even mean? The process of thinking about your real desires is paramount — it necessitates a recognition of whims versus ambitions. Whims will fall in the face of adversity while true desires will weather the storm. Wanting something means you are willing to forgo the alternatives. The cost of committing to an endeavour such as GAMSAT and a career in Medicine will evidently involve many sacrifices. Less evident is the imposed growth that such processes enforce, which represents a further challenge to accept and overcome. Awareness of your ambitions and why they are important to you will soften the blow of the sacrifices you will invariably be making both now while you study, and in your future work. What would your life look like to get what you want? After considering what it is you want, you may have landed on a career in Medicine which involves success in the GAMSAT (and if you didn’t, then pursue whatever else it is you want). Success requires a set of goals and an associated plan. Your plan at present will necessarily focus more on GAMSAT, and you will need to take responsibility in structuring your life so that you are maximising your potential. Taking responsibility for your studies prevents others from allocating your time (which will not assist you in your goals). But also keep in mind that planning your days, weeks, and months requires negotiating with yourself — you cannot be your own tyrant. Finally, what would your life be like if you habitually did the difficult tasks? Candidates that perform well in the GAMSAT (and in many other areas of life), make doing difficult tasks a habit. In GAMSAT, this means sitting practice exams under timed conditions, receiving honest feedback, and continually asking questions to improve. The result of these processes (whether failure or success) is always productive. Consider that your overall aim may be to score 70+ in GAMSAT and enter Medicine. The fastest way to this destination is via a routine committed to completing the tasks most avoid. It does not matter where you start, or the number of failures you encounter along the way — it is the process that is most important.`)} Arror right

Graphical Interpretation In GAMSAT

Graphical Interpretation In GAMSAT

Below is a common graph seen in GAMSAT — and commonly confusing for students — which pertains to glucose excretion depending on serum concentration. 

${reading_time(`A graph is a visual representation of the relationship between two or more variables (X and Y variables). They enable more straightforward comprehension of data and make the process of interpretation more efficient, as it may be inefficient and cumbersome to report data in a table (or worse, still in written form). Typically, there will be an independent variable (the X-axis, usually time or some intervention) and the dependent variables (the Y-axis). When assessing a graph, take the time to understand the variables and to hypothesise what the relationship may be prior to looking at the body of the graph. In many cases you will be able to hypothesise the relationship based on knowledge from your studies. Students who fail to do this are likely to become confused when looking at the graph. After predicting what the relationship might be based on your knowledge, you can refer to the body of the graph for the depicted relationship. At this point, you are not interested in forming conclusions, only reporting what you see. The best way to do this is to verbalise your findings: “As <X-variable> increases, <Y-variable> increases/decreases in a direct/exponential manner.” In some cases, there may be no change in the dependent variable as the independent variable changes (in which case there is no relationship). Below is a common graph seen in GAMSAT — and commonly confusing for students — which pertains to glucose excretion depending on serum concentration.  Glucose excretion from the kidneys is dependent on its serum concentration.  When we examine the figure, we can deduce that the independent variable is the amount of sugar in the blood. The dependent variables are the amount of sugar filtered to form filtrate (not yet urine), the amount of glucose reabsorbed into the blood from the filtrate, and the amount of glucose that is excreted in urine (formally filtrate, and not reabsorbed). Firstly, consider the relationship between serum glucose and glucose in the filtrate. Without looking at the graph, you will know that this will be a positive and direct relationship. At this point, we are not interested in the other two dependent variables. As serum glucose goes up, filtered glucose will go up. Assessing the graph, we can see this is indeed the case. Secondly, the relationship between serum glucose and glucose reabsorption from filtrate back into blood can be considered. With knowledge of renal physiology, we would expect that to a certain serum (and therefore filtrate) concentration that all glucose in the filtrate would be reabsorbed, but that at some point the resorptive function would become saturated and over a window of concentration that decreasing amount of additional glucose could be absorbed. The relationship would therefore initially be positive and direct before flattening out after which no relationship would exist. This is indeed the case when looking at the purple line in the graph shown. Finally, consider the relationship between serum glucose and excretion of glucose. As serum glucose increases, we would expect glucose excretion to only increase once reabsorption is saturated. The relationship should therefore commence flat prior to rising and then becoming positive and direct.`)} Arror right

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